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NewsReal Sunday: Ft. Hood, Freedom, and Sacrifice

November 8, 2009

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“Soldiers die setting people free, and that’s more like Jesus than I’ll ever be.” – lyric from Susan Coats’ Pants by Randall Goodgame

It’s been quite a week for veterans.  The President’s visit to Dover to see fallen soldiers and their families, the Fort Hood Massacre, and Veteran’s Day have got me thinking about sacrifice.  We have seen so many soldiers being killed both abroad and now on a US military base.  You cannot help but think about how the sacrifices of others can bring us freedom.

Sadly, the terrorist Army psychiatrist Major Malik Nadal Hasan who slaughtered those troops at Ft. Hood has a warped view of sacrifice.  His idea of sacrifice is that a soldier saving buddies by falling on a grenade is equal to suicide bombers.  Here is Senator Joe Lieberman talking about that today on Fox News.

A sacrifice that brings terror is not sacrifice – it is terrorism.  Real sacrifice always brings freedom. Real sacrifice is dying to your own selfish desires so that others might gain freedom. As a Christian, the perfect example we have of sacrifice is Jesus.  He laid down his life that all others may truly live.  And right after telling his followers He would do that, He told them this:

“If anyone would come after me, he must deny himself and take up his cross daily and follow me.”

Dr. Hasan is still alive. He sacrificed nothing. He gave no one freedom.  He took and stole peace and joy from over a dozen families.  This week let us remember that our soldiers put themselves in harm’s way every single day. Those soldiers died ready to defend our freedom.

This week I challenge you all to go and thank at least one veteran for giving a true sacrifice for your freedom.

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5 Comments
  1. Elaine B permalink
    November 8, 2009 6:06 pm

    Amen to that.

  2. Anthony Damato permalink
    November 9, 2009 12:41 am

    Your post about sacrifice reminds me of the obscure King Shutruk-Nahunte, who boasted of his conquests, yet, remains largely unknow in modern times.

    “ I am Shutruk-Nahunte [sic], King of Anshan and Susa, Sovereign of the land of Elam. By the command of Inshushinak, I destroyed Sippar, took the stele of Niran-Sin [sic], and brought it back to Elam [sic], where I erected it as an offering to my God, Inshushinak. Shutruk-Nahunte – 1158 B.C. ”

    Mention of Nahunte from the movie “The Emperor’s Club”:

    http://wapedia.mobi/en/Shutruk-Nahhunte

    “….Plate above Mr. Hundert’s classroom door in The Emperor’s Club”:

    quote from a virtually unknown king, who speaks of his list of conquests, but speaks nothing about the benefits. This king is unknown in history, because “great ambition and conquest without contribution is without significance.””

  3. Jack Hampton permalink
    November 9, 2009 4:11 am

    When the first Desert Storm began I wondered if the Game Box and cell phone generation had the grit to hang in there? I was an idiot these young men and women make me look like an inept wuss on my best day. I cannot tell you how proud of these fine young people I am. I am angered by the senseless deaths of these brothers and sisters in arms to the point I am probably unfit to comment because of that anger.

  4. November 9, 2009 10:40 am

    If nothing else, Joe gets it and has a pair so he can say it.

    As I stood with my fellow vets on Sunday at our church and received the thanks of those in attendance, I felt honored to stand with those men who gave years of their lives and, in some cases, far more to secure the freedoms we hold dear for every citizen.

    They were to a man, horrified that the Fort Hood slaughter could even be contemplated by a field grade officer, let alone be executed. The ever widening affect of diversity and political correctness will have long range ramifications which we shall all feel the effects of eventually.

    God help us all.

  5. j c original permalink
    November 9, 2009 5:44 pm

    This is a good example of- group identity politics. Right or Wrong

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